Welcome to the Uber Forum!

Welcome to one of the best resources on Transportation Network Companies (TNCs)! Uber Forum is an independent and unbiased resource to discuss Uber, Lyft, Postmates, Instacart, Favor, Deliv, DoorDash and more! Uber Forum has over 4,000+ members and 100,000+ posts! Please join the Uber Forum community by signing up today! Registration is FREE and will enable you to post messages. We can't wait to see you online! :)

Sign Up Now!

Car squawk! Uber slams councilman over livery law

Discussion in 'Uber Drivers Forum' started by Harry Flashman, Jul 14, 2015.

Uber Driver Promo Code | Lyft Driver Promo Code

  1. Harry Flashman

    Harry Flashman
    Expand Collapse
    Moderator
    Staff Member

    Country:
    Australia
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    769
    Likes Received:
    345
  2. MileHighDriver

    MileHighDriver
    Expand Collapse
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2015
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    89
    I can't speak "officially" for Uber, nor is this forum authorized by Uber (and no, I am not an employee of Uber or "plant," on this or any other forum, and other than a contractor/driver and occasional passenger/customer, I have absolutely no affiliation with Uber) but here's my $.02....

    Some comments on Harry's post/link:
    1. The councilman brings up a good point about the additional cars in the city and the resultant increase in pollution. I'm not in NYC area but my impression is that it is major gridlock, especially in Manhattan at all hours of the day. The other boroughs I can only assume are experiencing additional traffic due to TNC ride providers. The number of car trips by residents may be declining because riders using Uber and other TNC providers instead of their own cars but the number of cars on the street at any given time has to be higher than before Uber came to New York.

    2. Quoting a portion of the article, the councilman is sponsoring a bill to

      "...drastically limit the number of new livery cars that can get licenses in the city during a 12-month period. Companies with large fleets would be allowed to ramp up by one percent of the current number of cars. Since Uber now has about 18,000 licensed cars in the city, that means it would only be able to add about 180 more over the next 12 months — a significant cut for a company that has been registering hundreds of cars a month."

      I can't help but wonder if 18,000 represents active drivers/cars (those who do at least 1 trip a month) or is simply the number of registered cars/drivers, including those who have had their dreams of financial independence shattered by the lack of available riders with so many cars on the road, especially at what we would consider "peak," times. Someone commented in another thread on why taxicab medallions are restricted--to limit the number of service providers. I personally believe that my market is oversaturated with drivers/partners, causing some (new and old) to say they've had enough and the lack of revenue (notice I did not say "lack of trips") makes it not worth the time nor wear and tear on the car or the driver.

    3. Uber's emailing customers (riders and I assume drivers) in the councilman's district isn't sitting well with me. It's one thing to use email to inform the customers of promotions going on, temporary discounted fares for the week, etc., but to use that same system for political lobbying seems questionable. I don't recall any option within my rider account or partner account to "opt-out," of email (or text) announcements from Uber or Rasier LLC. I usually accept without reading the fine print, all TOS that I run into when I register online for anything.

    My bottom line (related to Point #2 above) is that Uber (or the local regulatory agency) needs to come up with a realistic figure, specific to each market, on the maximum number of driver/partners in that market, only signing up new partners when attrition (driver dissatisfaction) causes that number to drop. Depending on the market, that figure may be lower than the current number of active drivers. That said, I'm not suggesting that Uber (or regulatory agencies) force drivers to quit, rather let nature take it's course and drop the number naturally (read here that Houston is telling "new" drivers that they can't drive; don't think that's the way to go), and STOP SIGNING UP NEW DRIVERS!!!!!!

    $.02 (at least!)
    MHD
     
    Harry Flashman likes this.
Draft saved Draft deleted
Loading...

Share This Page